Grammy Award-Winning Jazz Legend Al Jarreau Dead At 76

Los Angeles, CA – Just days after retiring from a nearly 50-year streak of touring, Grammy Award-winning jazz singer Al Jarreau has passed away at the age of 76.

On February 8, Jarreau checked into a Los Angeles hospital due to exhaustion and remained there until his death earlier this morning. He was to turn 77 approximately one month later on March 12.

Following the reports of his death, his publicity team released a statement via his website.

Al Jarreau passed away today, February 12, 2017. He will be missed. A few days ago, I was asked to describe Al to someone who knew of his success, but did not know him as a person. I responded with this: His 2nd priority in life was music. There was no 3rd. His 1st priority, far ahead of the other, was healing or comforting anyone in need. Whether it was emotional pain, or physical discomfort, or any other cause of suffering, he needed to put our minds at ease and our hearts at rest. He needed to see a warm, affirming smile where there had not been one before. Song was just his tool for making that happen.

Born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin in 1940, Jarreau would go on to release more than 20 projects and amass seven Grammy Awards throughout his career. His hits include the theme song to the 80s TV show Moonlighting, “We’re In This Love Together” and singing alongside countless stars on the “We Are the World” record. His records were also used as the sample base for rap stars such as De La Soul, Little Brother and Three Six Mafia over the years.

Several members of the Hip Hop community and entertainment world reacted to his death early this morning.

The Great Al Jarreau. RIP

A photo posted by Nasir Jones (@nas) on

“We’re in this love together.” Bright words for dark days. Saluting Al Jarreau. Mom played his vinyl. His voice made me happy. At rest now. pic.twitter.com/staFXGBhOD

— Ava DuVernay (@ava) February 12, 2017

So crazy that they’re both gone. RIP to the legendary Al Jarreau: https://t.co/wKKZaH2oq4

— Phonte (@phontigallo) February 12, 2017

Rest in power, @AlJarreau. U were EVERYTHING Jazz & beyond with an unrivaled improvisational genius. Love & prayers 2 his family & fans. pic.twitter.com/XylxkaAILe

— Chaka Khan (@ChakaKhan) February 12, 2017

RIP Al Jarreau #BlackExcellence

— Consequence (@ItsTheCons) February 12, 2017

rest in peace al jarreau. breakin away really held my childhood down.

— go ronnie. (@TIRON) February 12, 2017

RIP Al Jarreau. 🙏🏾 https://t.co/zghXsyA0cY

— Wally Sparks (@djwallysparks) February 12, 2017

We’ve lost another music great. I mean Great. Rest In Peace Al Jarreau 🎶🙏🏽💔 pic.twitter.com/PQubGykqbY

— Holly Robinson Peete (@hollyrpeete) February 12, 2017

Once upon a time… a dream came true for me and I jammed out on percussion with the greatest jazz vocalist of… https://t.co/MCtdTc4AAK

— Mark Batson (@Markbatsonmusic) February 12, 2017

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T.I. Stands With Charles Oakley After Arrest At Madison Square Garden

Last Wednesday (February 8), New York Knicks legend Charles Oakley was involved in a shoving match with Madison Square Garden security that eventually led to his arrest. Despite Oakley’s contributions to the squad, he has been banned by owner James Dolan, which led T.I. to stand in solidarity with the imposing former player.

On Friday (February 10), the announcement was made that Oakley would be banned from entering Madison Square Garden. Fans from all walks of life stepped up in defense of Oakley and he has since reached out via Twitter to thank those who have spoken up in wake of the arrest.

I love NYC I LOVE the Knicks that you for all your love .. I will be holding a Press conference next week Let’s go Knicks

— Charles Oakley (@CharlesOakley34) February 11, 2017

T.I.’s stance was made known via his Instagram account, which featured a photo of Oakley with the caption reading ““If HE can’t go. WE ain’t goin!!! #OGOakley” to go along with the post. What that means exactly isn’t known, but it appears Tip is asking people to not support the team or that he himself will no longer attend games for the duration of Oakley’s banishment from the arena.

“I love NYC I LOVE the Knicks [thank] you for all your love .. I will be holding a Press conference next week Let’s go Knicks,” tweeted Oakley on Friday. He followed that tweet for by thanking former and current NBA players for also stepping up for him.

Oakley was allegedly booted from the arena for making inappropriate comments during the game, which prompted the response from the arena’s security staff.

I want thank all in players and pass NBA players as well as family and friends for all your love and support

— Charles Oakley (@CharlesOakley34) February 11, 2017

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Public Enemy’s “Yo! Bum Rush The Show” Was “The Best Shit” AMG Ever Heard In His Life

Public Enemy stormed onto the Hip Hop scene in the late 1980s and is now one of the foundational groups of the culture. Their sophomore output, 1988’s It Takes a Nation of Millions To Hold Us Back, has been called “the greatest Hip Hop album ever,” but the New York crew’s journey started with 1987’s Yo! Bum Rush the Show, which celebrated its 30th anniversary yesterday (February 10).

Speaking with Unique Access Entertainment, AMG breaks down why the album is so special.

“They had just that crazy, crazy sound combined with what Chuck was saying and it just had me stuck,” he says about Public Enemy’s debut project.

Yo! Bum Rush the Show was the world’s introduction to a cast of characters that was Chuck D, Flavor Flav, Terminator X and Professor Griff. In a time when social media wasn’t even a thought, fans had to learn about the members through other means. AMG recalls meeting the group at a show in Los Angeles and wanting to compliment Chuck D on his powerful rhymes.

“I walked up to Terminator X, was talking to him like, ‘Man, what you said,’” he recalls. “He’s like, ‘I’m not Chuck D.’ I’m looking at the biggest dude going like this gotta be the guy. He’s got the big voice. He’s like, ‘That’s Chuck D.’ I’m like, ‘The little dude right there?’”

Yes, the little dude right there was Chuck D, who has become iconic in his own way as the group challenged and empowered audiences with songs like “Rightstarter (Message To A Black Man).”

“It made you go pick up some books and understand what they weren’t teaching you in school,” AMG says of the track. “There’s a lot more to you than just what you thought, especially if you didn’t have that education.”

He emphasizes the influence of Chuck D’s flow on the album. The gold-certified rapper spits a few lines of “Timebomb” as he explains how he crafted his own sound growing up listening to Public Enemy.

“That’s when I was kind of developing my style,” he says. “I didn’t even have an idea of what I was going to do or if I was ever going to do music. I was just a kid trying to rap. But his voice, I wanted a commanding voice. It wasn’t deep, but it was gonna be big and bold like Chuck D’s was.”

Other standout tracks include “You’re gonna Get Yours” and “Public Enemy No.1,” which AMG says “sounded like the best shit I ever heard in my life.”

Besides the fierce political content, he applauds the album for its production. AMG, who’s worked extensively (and beefed) with DJ Quik, says that the Bomb Squad created a “beautiful collage” with its production work and all of the elements woven into the LP.

“The pictures they painted, they still hold true today,” he says.

Perhaps the greatest reason this album is one to remember is because it gave birth to a whole new genre of rap. AMG says that Yo! Bum Rush the Show‘s impact was felt across the country and Public Enemy’s work was just the foundation for an entire generation of the culture.

“It built what we call West Coast Hip Hop,” he says. “I know N.W.A, that’s one of their major influences as far as making records. That was the only record out that was killing it at the time. That was something to beat. Even though it wasn’t a grand commercial success, those are the best things, like cult movies. They had a cult following, which turned into massive success after popularity came. But records like that, you’re not going to get again, not at all.”

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Public Enemy’s “Yo! Bum Rush The Show” Was “The Best Shit” AMG Ever Heard In His Life

Public Enemy stormed onto the Hip Hop scene in the late 1980s and is now one of the foundational groups of the culture. Their sophomore output, 1988’s It Takes a Nation of Millions To Hold Us Back, has been called “the greatest Hip Hop album ever,” but the New York crew’s journey started with 1987’s Yo! Bum Rush the Show, which celebrated its 30th anniversary yesterday (February 10).

Speaking with Unique Access Entertainment, AMG breaks down why the album is so special.

“They had just that crazy, crazy sound combined with what Chuck was saying and it just had me stuck,” he says about Public Enemy’s debut project.

Yo! Bum Rush the Show was the world’s introduction to a cast of characters that was Chuck D, Flavor Flav, Terminator X and Professor Griff. In a time when social media wasn’t even a thought, fans had to learn about the members through other means. AMG recalls meeting the group at a show in Los Angeles and wanting to compliment Chuck D on his powerful rhymes.

“I walked up to Terminator X, was talking to him like, ‘Man, what you said,’” he recalls. “He’s like, ‘I’m not Chuck D.’ I’m looking at the biggest dude going like this gotta be the guy. He’s got the big voice. He’s like, ‘That’s Chuck D.’ I’m like, ‘The little dude right there?’”

Yes, the little dude right there was Chuck D, who has become iconic in his own way as the group challenged and empowered audiences with songs like “Rightstarter (Message To A Black Man).”

“It made you go pick up some books and understand what they weren’t teaching you in school,” AMG says of the track. “There’s a lot more to you than just what you thought, especially if you didn’t have that education.”

He emphasizes the influence of Chuck D’s flow on the album. The gold-certified rapper spits a few lines of “Timebomb” as he explains how he crafted his own sound growing up listening to Public Enemy.

“That’s when I was kind of developing my style,” he says. “I didn’t even have an idea of what I was going to do or if I was ever going to do music. I was just a kid trying to rap. But his voice, I wanted a commanding voice. It wasn’t deep, but it was gonna be big and bold like Chuck D’s was.”

Other standout tracks include “You’re gonna Get Yours” and “Public Enemy No.1,” which AMG says “sounded like the best shit I ever heard in my life.”

Besides the fierce political content, he applauds the album for its production. AMG, who’s worked extensively (and beefed) with DJ Quik, says that the Bomb Squad created a “beautiful collage” with its production work and all of the elements woven into the LP.

“The pictures they painted, they still hold true today,” he says.

Perhaps the greatest reason this album is one to remember is because it gave birth to a whole new genre of rap. AMG says that Yo! Bum Rush the Show‘s impact was felt across the country and Public Enemy’s work was just the foundation for an entire generation of the culture.

“It built what we call West Coast Hip Hop,” he says. “I know N.W.A, that’s one of their major influences as far as making records. That was the only record out that was killing it at the time. That was something to beat. Even though it wasn’t a grand commercial success, those are the best things, like cult movies. They had a cult following, which turned into massive success after popularity came. But records like that, you’re not going to get again, not at all.”

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Public Enemy’s “Yo! Bum Rush The Show” Was “The Best Shit” AMG Ever Heard In His Life

Public Enemy stormed onto the Hip Hop scene in the late 1980s and is now one of the foundational groups of the culture. Their sophomore output, 1988’s It Takes a Nation of Millions To Hold Us Back, has been called “the greatest Hip Hop album ever,” but the New York crew’s journey started with 1987’s Yo! Bum Rush the Show, which celebrated its 30th anniversary yesterday (February 10).

Speaking with Unique Access Entertainment, AMG breaks down why the album is so special.

“They had just that crazy, crazy sound combined with what Chuck was saying and it just had me stuck,” he says about Public Enemy’s debut project.

Yo! Bum Rush the Show was the world’s introduction to a cast of characters that was Chuck D, Flavor Flav, Terminator X and Professor Griff. In a time when social media wasn’t even a thought, fans had to learn about the members through other means. AMG recalls meeting the group at a show in Los Angeles and wanting to compliment Chuck D on his powerful rhymes.

“I walked up to Terminator X, was talking to him like, ‘Man, what you said,’” he recalls. “He’s like, ‘I’m not Chuck D.’ I’m looking at the biggest dude going like this gotta be the guy. He’s got the big voice. He’s like, ‘That’s Chuck D.’ I’m like, ‘The little dude right there?’”

Yes, the little dude right there was Chuck D, who has become iconic in his own way as the group challenged and empowered audiences with songs like “Rightstarter (Message To A Black Man).”

“It made you go pick up some books and understand what they weren’t teaching you in school,” AMG says of the track. “There’s a lot more to you than just what you thought, especially if you didn’t have that education.”

He emphasizes the influence of Chuck D’s flow on the album. The gold-certified rapper spits a few lines of “Timebomb” as he explains how he crafted his own sound growing up listening to Public Enemy.

“That’s when I was kind of developing my style,” he says. “I didn’t even have an idea of what I was going to do or if I was ever going to do music. I was just a kid trying to rap. But his voice, I wanted a commanding voice. It wasn’t deep, but it was gonna be big and bold like Chuck D’s was.”

Other standout tracks include “You’re gonna Get Yours” and “Public Enemy No.1,” which AMG says “sounded like the best shit I ever heard in my life.”

Besides the fierce political content, he applauds the album for its production. AMG, who’s worked extensively (and beefed) with DJ Quik, says that the Bomb Squad created a “beautiful collage” with its production work and all of the elements woven into the LP.

“The pictures they painted, they still hold true today,” he says.

Perhaps the greatest reason this album is one to remember is because it gave birth to a whole new genre of rap. AMG says that Yo! Bum Rush the Show‘s impact was felt across the country and Public Enemy’s work was just the foundation for an entire generation of the culture.

“It built what we call West Coast Hip Hop,” he says. “I know N.W.A, that’s one of their major influences as far as making records. That was the only record out that was killing it at the time. That was something to beat. Even though it wasn’t a grand commercial success, those are the best things, like cult movies. They had a cult following, which turned into massive success after popularity came. But records like that, you’re not going to get again, not at all.”

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Young Dolph Demands Apology From Yo Gotti & Blames Him For Starting Beef

Atlanta, GA – While promoting his latest project, Gelato, Young Dolph dropped a bombshell during an interview with DJ Holiday on the Atlanta radio station, Streetz 94.5, where he addressed the most recent “situation” between the “King of Memphis” rapper and his predecessor Yo Gotti, and ultimately demanded an apology. In reference to the blatant diss track, “Play Wit Yo Bitch,” he said he should have named it “Truth,” and elaborated, “This the first diss song Dolph ever put out. It really ain’t even a diss song, it’s just straight facts.”

He also explained his reasoning behind the track, which he says stemmed from Gotti trying to subtly diss him first in a couple of his recent mixtapes. “He did it two times,” he said. “The last two tapes he done put out. He thought the coast was clear, okay. He know what I do. He like, ‘Dolph ain’t paying us no attention. Dolph getting them Ms. He racking ’em up, going crazy, by himself. He ain’t paying no attention.’ He thought the coast was clear.”

When asked what initially sparked the animosity between the two Memphis rappers, Dolph speculated it was because of his refusal to sign with Gotti’s label when Dolph began to gain traction. His answer presumably won’t make things any better.

“Sign with him for what?” he asked. “Hell naw it didn’t make sense. Look what Dolph doin. Nope. I can’t do it. Nope. Cocaine Musik faggots. No. That ain’t Dolph. I wouldn’t even feel right. I would feel so out of place over there with some faggots.”

Toward the end of the conversation, Dolph said the beef between the two could be squashed if Gotti would simply apologize “publicly” and if he doesn’t, he dropped an ominous piece of advice, “He just needs to stay out of my way.” There’s a sense, however, that won’t be happening anytime soon. Check out the full interview above.

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Young Dolph Demands Apology From Yo Gotti & Blames Him For Starting Beef

Atlanta, GA – While promoting his latest project, Gelato, Young Dolph dropped a bombshell during an interview with DJ Holiday on the Atlanta radio station, Streetz 94.5, where he addressed the most recent “situation” between the “King of Memphis” rapper and his predecessor Yo Gotti, and ultimately demanded an apology. In reference to the blatant diss track, “Play Wit Yo Bitch,” he said he should have named it “Truth,” and elaborated, “This the first diss song Dolph ever put out. It really ain’t even a diss song, it’s just straight facts.”

He also explained his reasoning behind the track, which he says stemmed from Gotti trying to subtly diss him first in a couple of his recent mixtapes. “He did it two times,” he said. “The last two tapes he done put out. He thought the coast was clear, okay. He know what I do. He like, ‘Dolph ain’t paying us no attention. Dolph getting them Ms. He racking ’em up, going crazy, by himself. He ain’t paying no attention.’ He thought the coast was clear.”

When asked what initially sparked the animosity between the two Memphis rappers, Dolph speculated it was because of his refusal to sign with Gotti’s label when Dolph began to gain traction. His answer presumably won’t make things any better.

“Sign with him for what?” he asked. “Hell naw it didn’t make sense. Look what Dolph doin. Nope. I can’t do it. Nope. Cocaine Musik faggots. No. That ain’t Dolph. I wouldn’t even feel right. I would feel so out of place over there with some faggots.”

Toward the end of the conversation, Dolph said the beef between the two could be squashed if Gotti would simply apologize “publicly” and if he doesn’t, he dropped an ominous piece of advice, “He just needs to stay out of my way.” There’s a sense, however, that won’t be happening anytime soon. Check out the full interview above.

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Young Dolph Demands Apology From Yo Gotti & Blames Him For Starting Beef

Atlanta, GA – While promoting his latest project, Gelato, Young Dolph dropped a bombshell during an interview with DJ Holiday on the Atlanta radio station, Streetz 94.5, where he addressed the most recent “situation” between the “King of Memphis” rapper and his predecessor Yo Gotti, and ultimately demanded an apology. In reference to the blatant diss track, “Play Wit Yo Bitch,” he said he should have named it “Truth,” and elaborated, “This the first diss song Dolph ever put out. It really ain’t even a diss song, it’s just straight facts.”

He also explained his reasoning behind the track, which he says stemmed from Gotti trying to subtly diss him first in a couple of his recent mixtapes. “He did it two times,” he said. “The last two tapes he done put out. He thought the coast was clear, okay. He know what I do. He like, ‘Dolph ain’t paying us no attention. Dolph getting them Ms. He racking ’em up, going crazy, by himself. He ain’t paying no attention.’ He thought the coast was clear.”

When asked what initially sparked the animosity between the two Memphis rappers, Dolph speculated it was because of his refusal to sign with Gotti’s label when Dolph began to gain traction. His answer presumably won’t make things any better.

“Sign with him for what?” he asked. “Hell naw it didn’t make sense. Look what Dolph doin. Nope. I can’t do it. Nope. Cocaine Musik faggots. No. That ain’t Dolph. I wouldn’t even feel right. I would feel so out of place over there with some faggots.”

Toward the end of the conversation, Dolph said the beef between the two could be squashed if Gotti would simply apologize “publicly” and if he doesn’t, he dropped an ominous piece of advice, “He just needs to stay out of my way.” There’s a sense, however, that won’t be happening anytime soon. Check out the full interview above.

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Nelly Speaks On New England Patriots Protesting Visit To Donald Trump’s White House

Los Angeles, CA – Nelly has proven his capabilities as a person who knows sports in times past and offered some of his measured opinion regarding the Super Bowl champion New England Patriots. The St. Louis rapper shared his insight on the protests by several Pats players to forgo the traditional visit to the White House in protest of President Donald Trump and his administration’s policies.

The 42-year-old artist was on Fox Sports 1’s Skip and Shannon: Undisputed show and weighed in on the controversial stances taken by Martellus Bennett, Alan Branch, LaGarrette Blount, Chris Long, Dont’a Hightower, and Devin McCourty. Nelly believes that this is just the start of similar protests to take place across the professional sports universe.

“This is the beginning,” Nelly said. “This is gonna get a lot worse before it gets better anytime soon and I’m talking all the way across the board. Now you have to look at all the major sports franchises and how this is going to play out. You have to look at the demographics on a lot of the sports franchises.”

Nelly added, “You go to [the] NHL, you go to the MLB. It’s a lot of Latin players in the MLB. How does [Trump’s administration] play with the global branding of the MLB? How does it go with the global branding for any sports franchise?”

After host Shannon Sharpe quipped that players in the NBA could be affected by the ban, Nelly retorted by saying because of the league’s largely black makeup, players who’ve won the NBA championship would also forgo the tradition of visiting the president in Washington.

Watch the full interview in the clip above.

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